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Portfolio

"We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories."

Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

Bailey's Words

Ubuntu Edge Release Website Content Spec

Convergence is the Ubuntu Edge

August 2013

Crowdfunding Backers Can Experience the Future of Technology Today

Next-generation hardware

Through Ubuntu, the phone and PC have converged into one super-device with a perfectly-sized sapphire crystal screen for full one-handed navigation control, visual quality, and scratch protection. An exterior made of a single metal sheet means a better grip and just the right amount of heft in the hand.  Learn more about the design [link].

Compatible and innovative software

With its simple, instant, and uncluttered navigation, this phone has no need for a home button. The phone dual boots in Android and Ubuntu mobile OS, and lets users run the same apps from their Android phone OS. Learn more about the comp ability [link].

 Don’t miss your chance

This phone is only available to the crowdfunders who gave it life via the summer 2013 Indiegogo campaign [link]. Your chance comes soon to support and experience the next piece of cutting edge technology from Ubuntu. Learn more about our crowd funding campaign [link].


Adobe Cloud Blog Post

August 2013

Adobe’s launch of Creative Cloud is not far behind us, and some customers are unsure what that means for the way they use Adobe programs.  In short, instead of a one-time software installation purchase, customers will now get their Adobe software programs through a subscription service known as Adobe Creative Cloud.  Leading software companies like Adobe are moving toward subscription programs for good reason: It’s becoming clear that subscription models are the future of software.  Although that may take some getting used to, it’s a good thing.  Receiving software through a subscription service puts the focus on users and gives them more control of the way they use programs like Adobe Creative.

The subscription model is a new space for Adobe, and the company is rolling out changes every week, but Adobe Creative Cloud gives program users control of the way they use the software.

Online Community

By interacting with other Adobe customers on the Cloud message boards, customers can troubleshoot, learn new skills, and share ideas.  They can also share files with anyone who has an email address, not just Cloud members and not just people who own Adobe programs.  Adobe members can also collaborate on projects, store up to 20GB of files.  They can sync and publish to Behance portfolios and up to 5 of their own websites provided by Adobe.

Work the Way You Like

There are plenty of benefits to working online, but if a customer prefers to be offline or doesn’t always have internet available, they won’t lose access to Adobe programs.  The software is downloaded, and customers access it just the way they always would have with Creative Suite.

Also, if a customer likes to get the latest updates as soon as they’re available, he or she doesn’t have to pay extra for them or wait to buy a new version of the software.  Customers can update whatever program whenever an update is available.  Also, customers never have to update a program.  Maybe they’re working with others who have older versions of the software, or just really like a particular function and don’t want to change it.  The program users decide when and if to update, depending on what works best for them or their team.

Flexible Subscription Plans

Adobe calls their subscription pricing “Membership Plans,” which makes sense given the community focus of the Creative Cloud.  Pricing includes plans for individuals, education, teams, and enterprises.   Customers can sign up for an annual plan, or a monthly plan that they can cancel any time.  Students and teachers get steep discounts, as do Adobe customers who already have CS3 through CS6.  Only need one program?  Only buy one program.  More benefits are available for specific plans.  Visit Adobe for a full list of buying options.

Also check out: PC Mag has explored the customer benefit between the traditional one-time fee Adobe model and the new subscription service. 

Subscription software services like Adobe Creative Cloud give customers more control over the programs they use and the way they use them.  There’s more ahead—capabilities of these models have only begun to reach their full potential to focus on customer needs.  If you’re still apprehensive about such a large change, try Adobe Creative Cloud free for 30 days and see what it has to offer you and the way you work.  


The Simple Moscow Mule

August 2013

Article for Examiner.com about making the delicious and fancy Moscow Mule in your own kitchen.


Maid-Rite Blog Posts

July-August 2013

End-of-summer post series for Maid-Rite and their awesome loose beef sandwiches.

AgCarolina Farm Credit

February 2014

Reorganization and revamping of AgCarolina's customer website content.


Rambling Pines Day Camp

November 2013

Clean up and reorganization of Rambling Pines' site content.


Yemassee Literary Journal

August 2012-May 2013

Voice creation and content updates for Yemassee's website


Planet Sub

July 2010

Voice update and suggested content for new Planet Sub About Us page.

Accounts Maintained

Yemassee August 2012-May 2013, Planet Sub May-August 2010

Maintained the Yemassee Literary Journal Twitter and Facebook accounts, and Iowa area Planet Sub stores' Twitter accounts, now @PlanetSubIowa.

Seance

February 2012

Short story

Won second place in the Fall Short Story Contest

Nominated for a Pushcart Prize: Best of Small Presses


Gutter

July 2009

Short story

Won second place in the journal's Emerging Writer Contest


Leftovers

Short story

Part of the journal's 100-Word Story Contest